Erosion Engineering

January 29, 2017 at 9:00 am (News, Science) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Alright stop!   Collaborate and listen.  The Little V’s are back with a brand new invention.  Vantaztic Learning has some mad skills on the mic, but even I can’t touch the brilliance that came from these young problem-solvers.  Your mind will be blown back to the 90’s to when we thought this track was solid,

Image result for vanilla ice 90s

as you listen to these clever devils collaborate.  See the thought process unfold for yourself as the scientists explain how their prototypes will slow beach erosion.

Makerspaces Engineering Erosion Project

Some background info for our readers:  The kids spent a day to design a blueprint of how their idea would look and created a write up of how it works.

Makerspaces Engineering

Day two (this day) was focused on creation of their sketch.  Next week they will test their project to see if it does in fact work, and if for some reason not, back to the drawing board.  For our fourth event day, we’ve invited a couple of professionals from our local community with background knowledge and first hand experience in beach renourishment to visit and listen to the students as they present their ideas, discuss the successes and drawbacks of the pretesting, and share their improvements.  Suppose we’ll have to wait to add more until testing and discussion take place, so for now . . . hit the hi-hat.  Word to your mother.

Makerspaces Engineering
Makerspaces Engineering

 

Makerspaces Engineering

We’re back and ready to share what worked and what needed modifications.  Our guest shall be here at the end of the month.  Enjoy, we’ll back after this paid programming announcement.

Erosion Wave Model

 

Engineering a Way to Slow Erosion
Wave Erosion Testing

2/23/17 Mr. Rudolph, “Rudi”, stopped in to listen to the young minds share their ideas and models to prevent beach erosion.  Mr. Rudi works for the Carteret County Shoreline Protection in Emerald Isle, NC.  He shared how to combat the erosion issue with the method Carteret County uses, dredging sand onto the beaches.  Fun Fact:  Sand is classified as sand if it is between 1/16-2 mm in size, any larger and it is mud, and then gravel.  Fun Fact:  An average of 1 million cubic yards are pumped onto the beach for a given project.  Fun Fact:  If sand is the erosion problem, then the solution is sand, putting it back to where it belongs.  The kids were engaged and developed terrific questions such as, “Would my hurt the environment?”, “How much sand is used to dredge back onto the beach?”, “How do you know when too much erosion is happening?”, and “What is your favorite part of your job?”.  Super way to end the week.  We are definitely spoiled to have so many resources at our fingertips.

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Some New, Some Old

February 8, 2016 at 9:00 am (News) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Posting some new projects in the works, and some that were already mentioned (new video to view though).  We spent the Friday with a two hour delay planting the germinated Spartina seeds into containers while others constructed the first PVC greenhouse tent that will rest on our raised flower beds.  We’ll take some of the Spartina to the high school’s greenhouse, but thought we could make our own mini versions for BSE’s campus.  Plus it was a great tie in with fractions and measurement.  Who knew that what you learn in school could actually be applied?  More pictures will be added to this post in the days/weeks to come.  It took about a week to create one tent (excluding sheeting).  We still need a few connectors to run our pipe along the ridge of the roof.  They did great working as teams and measuring thrice before cutting.  I think my PVC cutter is on it’s last run.  That brackish water though . . .  sulfur egg fart.  Fifth grade teachers were popping in asking if the septic had broke in the science lab restrooms.  Photography exclusively taken by Natalie.

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Echolocation Clips Below

Interpret Movement Data
Echolocation & Tech
Exploring Echolocation

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Coastal Federation

October 23, 2015 at 3:22 pm (News, Science) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Kristen Daly is a marine biologist that works in the educational department from the Coastal Federation right down the block from BSES.  She visited our class today to stress the importance of how storm water run off causes erosion and carries fertilizers and pesticides, not to forget litter, into our water ways.  The students each had a chance to add some type of consequence from the human footprint.  If only you could have been a fly in the room listening to them discuss and tie in topics of deforestation, erosion, conserving resources, being environmentally aware.  At times I wonder if they are listening.  Today proved not only that they are, but they’re also taking steps necessary to make life changes.  Yeah we recycle, but they also compost snacks, pick litter up around campus on their own accord, and are now voicing their awareness via blogging (click here to check out their stuff).  It is impressive for one so young to take charge.  As Stan Lee would say, “true believer.”

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Ecosystems, Erosion, & Estuaries

October 17, 2015 at 9:00 am (Science) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

These scientists are creating gusts of wind to erode sand.  They experimented with the effects of wind erosion with a barren field, then added sticks, rocks, and finally pine cones.  Our future leaders recorded and shared their observations on outcomes, and problem-solved how this issue could be addressed.

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After reading another spectacular KidBiz article on erosion, we created seawall replicas, modeled how they work, discussed why they’re built, and compared this to the planting of sea grass.  We examined the effects of how water can and will eventually find the path of least resistance, creeping it’s way to an ever changing landscape that is the coast (backyard).  We also performed the roles of wind and soil movements, pantomiming effects of erosion.

The NC Coastal Reserve visited us to discuss the effects our area suffers from erosion to estuaries and how these effect the ecosystem.  We have been selected to develop a plan to solve this issue.  Our crew will grow spartina grass from seed and keep track of the growth process throughout the winter.

CHS is allowing us to store the spartina in their green house until the spring, in which time we will then transfer it to a location in the sound near the school.  Real life problem solvers, not a multiple choice exercise.

Stay tuned for more action as we will create glaciers and observe how they also change Mother Earth’s landscape.

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Rain Garden Project

June 2, 2015 at 4:35 pm (School Supplies) (, , , , , , , , )

Finished.  From 8:00 – 9:45 we laid out Trey’s design, and got the plants in the ground.  Carolina Home & Garden delivered the compost and stone.

While the kiddos were in for specials and lunch a magical green thumb gnome transported the dirt we dug to needed areas around campus that were washed out and raked out most of the compost.  From 12:20-1:00 we shoveled the Delaware Round Stone around the perimeter. Thank you to Mrs. Tull for sitting with me to write the grant making this project come to fruition.  Thank you to the Bright Ideas Grant for choosing us as a recipient.

Thanks again to the kids and parents that came out the first time around to help us break ground, but importantly a huge shout-out to the Little V’s for making this natural filtration system.  Check out the 200+ pics below from our student camera crew.

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