1s & 5s

February 28, 2018 at 8:50 am (School Supplies) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

A bit lazy on the title I know, but I’m running out of STEAM.  Get it!?  (cue crickets chirping)   Eh . . .  anyway . . . let’s take a gander at first graders who continue applying their know-how about forces, pushes, and pulls. This lesson centered on pulls with the use of weight and gravity; much like what pulls glaciers if we recount to the last post with 4th grade’s topic.  These first graders tinkered with adding and/or subtracting the amount of washers to their vehicle by connecting them via string & paperclips.  After exploration time with the vehicles and the weights, the students repeated the activity beginning with one washer, then 2, 4, 6, and 8 writing down observations between each trial as to which provided the greatest/fastest pull, and why they believed this to be true.  We’ll pick up with this activity and review our discoveries in the next post.

Gravity Pulls
Weight & Gravity

 

Moving on to 5th where our marine biologists are using bathymetric sonar technology to map the ocean floor.  NOAA’s ship, the Okeanos Explorer, uses this type of sonar which flares out onto the ocean bottom, pinging data back to the ship in a color coded scale to outline trenches, volcanoes, sunken ships, etc.  These students constructed models of the abyss and/or trenches which they are preparing for another class.  Pictures of them sampling data by use of color coded straws are models built by another 5th grade class.  The lower the straw, the deeper the coordinate.  After recording the data the next step will be to transfer the information to a color bar graph, one sheet per column (columns were from A-J).  After the bar graphs are made for each column the students will cut, and glue the data in their journals to create a three dimensional pop-up scale.  We will have pictures once this is complete, so stay tuned and until then check out the pictures and video.

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Marine Debris

February 26, 2016 at 3:03 pm (Science) (, , , , , , , , , , , , )

Ask your kid what marine debris is, where it is found, and how it effects our oceans and I’ll bet you’ll receive a wealth of information.  The Coastal Federation visited us today to teach the kids about this topic, and how long it takes for given items to break down over time.  They also learned how litter effects marine life, easily mistaking it for food.  The students created a timeline, offering each item of trash by how long it took to break down.  The Coastal Fed had a follow up activity for us to try.  It would be great to incorporate technology with this topic and have those students that own a tablet, smartphone, or camera to snap shots of litter in their neighborhood keeping track of the amount of litter that could potentially make it’s way to our waterways.  Hopefully they’d pick it up (that around the house/neighborhood) and dispose of it in the appropriate container.

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